Be Careful How You Evaluate Real Estate Data/Statistics: 4 Examples

In today's world, we are often over – loaded with statistics, data, etc. Some of these might be relevant and significant, while at other times, they may be over – reaching, misleading, or unnecessary! We often hear or read discussions regarding mortgage interest rates, so – called – housing starts, number of mortgage applications, and the number of houses on the market, etc. Often, discussions focus on seeming to need to label the real estate market, either as a buyers or seller market! While there may be times these are valuable indicators and information, like most data, the skill is in how well one can interpret these, understand them, know what the numbers really mean, and how to use them. Let's review 4 examples of how statistics are related to real estate, etc.

1. Average or median price: The first thing to understand is the difference between an average and a median price. Average means one adds up all houses sold in the specific target region, and dividing by the number of sales. Median, on the other hand, is listing all the sales prices, and the one in the 50 percentile, is the median price. Simply stated assume 10 houses sold are reviewed, and 2 are sold at $500,000; 2 at $600,000; 1 at $750,000; 2 at $900,000; 2 at $1 million; and one at $1.5 million. In this sampling, the average price is $757,000 and the median price is $750,000. However, why is this information important, since if the sampling is not large enough, wouldn't it depend on which specific houses sold, whether there was more strength at the higher or lower end of the market, etc. When pricing is discussed, it's important to put it into perspective, and see the number of units compared in both periods of time.

2. Housing starts: This refers to number of new builds in an area, but doesn't it make sense, to also consider how much empty or available land/ property, might be available to build on. Always put all statistics into some sort of perspective!

3. Mortgage applications: Are these predominantly for new mortgages or refinances? Are they conventional mortgages? Might it also be important to look at the term of the mortgages? Shouldn't we also look at the criteria being used, and how many/ what percentage, are approved?

4. Houses on market: It is generally considered a buyer's market when there are significantly more houses on market, than buyers, and a seller's market, when circumstances are reversed? Look at the inventory of houses being offered, and the locales. How long do they seem to be staying on the market?

Like in most things statistics – related, it is important to know and evaluate what things mean, rather than making false assumptions, and/ or speculating. Beware of statistics, because they might turn out to either be your friend, or enemy!

Your Big Why and Planning the Future

A while back at an event I got the opportunity to sit across from a couple of brand new investors. As I usually do, I asked them what they were investing in; they admitted that they were newbies and weren't really sure where to begin. We discussed their level of knowledge and expertise, and I found the conversation drifting away from real estate and more into the lifestyle design arenas. I started asking them about their “Big Why” – why were they wanting to leave their corporate jobs, what they wanted to do with their time, and what would make them happy.

We started putting a dollar value to that lifestyle and level of comfort. I saw their eyes get a bit wide as the reality of what they were up against hit them. I quickly reassured them that real estate was a great choice to attain the lifestyle they envisioned if they were willing to work hard and put in the hours, but how? We didn't get into too much detail on the spot, but we talked about breaking those big goals down into time frames and smaller milestones. We discussed assigning how many and what type of deals could get them to those milestones, as well as what were they comfortable doing and how their personalities would help them to achieve their goal. They made notes on what types of marketing and how many offers they would have to make each month, week, and day in order to acquire the number of properties to hit their goals.

We then went back to their “Big Why” and discussed if it was really big enough. By that, I meant to talk to them about whether their choice to pursue real estate would be big enough to get them up and out of bed every day? Big enough to push them to tackle that daily task list? Big enough to hit those smaller goals knowing that as each milestone is hit that they are that much closer to the lifestyle and freedom they want? They made some more notes, and I think they had some talking points to consider as they pursue their real estate vision.

So what is your “Big Why”? Why are you a real estate investor? Is it big enough to get you out of bed each morning with a smile on your face, ready to face the day? Is it big enough to motivate you after 3 months of busting your butt without finding the right deal? This isn't something you can come up with overnight if you haven't spent any time on it already, so let your mind wander. Dream big! Dream really big and write it down. Look at it every day and see yourself living that lifestyle. Then break down how you will get there. Get really specific, all the way down to daily tasks. Now you've put goals and milestones on paper and you have created a map showing you how to get to that big dream and lifestyle you desire.

To be honest, this isn't easy. The dreaming part of this puzzle may be easier than identifying the “Why”, especially when you analyze and determine if your “Why” is a solid vision to which you can remain dedicated. Nevertheless, I promise, if you work hard to identify the “Why”, develop your vision, and stay focused, you will be set up to achieve the vision you set for yourself.

Should Long Term Real Estate Investors Focus On Cash Flow or Growth?

There are really two sides or two strategies to this debate. I lean one way for sure and will explain why but, I am also open about this and understand that other people have goals and strategies that differ from my own. In this article I want to briefly talk about both strategies and then give you some ideas to expand what you are trying to accomplish.

I want to define a long term investor as someone who is purchasing real estate with the strategy to hold onto it for at least 5 years but in most cases much longer. This is a great way to grow wealth and although it can be slow, it will guarantee financial freedom if the strategy is done correctly.

When we discuss lending the staple in the industry is the 30 year fixed rate loan. The advantage to this loan is that your principal and interest payment will remain constant for 30 years even though rents should increase. This loan also comes with the lowest payment in the market helping you to maximize cash flow. I put 30 year loans on my properties whenever possible. (This becomes more difficult as you get more properties which might be a topic for a different article). I like the cash flow because it gives me control and I can choose where to invest it.

The disadvantage to a 30 year loan is that it takes 30 years to pay off the house, assuming you make the minimum payment. If you are a believer in paying off your rentals then a shorter term loan might be a better strategy and will give you the discipline to actually do it. Because interest rates are important to a lot of investors it is important to know you will get a much better rate with a shorter term loan.

My personal belief is that if you are leveraged on your properties you can buy more properties and more properties create more cash flow and more growth. It is the best of both worlds. This is true only IF you are buying quality deals and have reserves and plans in place for the unexpected. As many of you know when I started investing with my wife we would leverage as much as we could and we purchased as many houses as we could. Needless to say that back fired and we lost almost everything. I share this because I want you to know that I understand that leverage creates additional risk. However, if you are purchasing properties that cash flow AFTER vacancies and maintenance there really is not much of a down side.

As you can see I am not a fan of paying off your real estate when you are in your growth strategy period. I believe this strongly for several reasons and have been quoted in major publications sharing my view. I do, however, think you should start paying them off as you get closer to retirement or when you are in a position that income becomes more important than growth. I also understand that many people have a different risk tolerance than me.

There is one thing I want to caution you about. I would not recommend purchasing property on speculation. Again, we learned this the hard way. If you purchase for cash flow, whether you choose to pay off the property or not, you won't get hurt. If you cash flow and the house decreases in value, you keep it and enjoy the cash flow. If it goes up in value… well, you either keep it to enjoy the cash flow or you can sell it and take the cash. Don't get caught up on any of the hype. In Denver the big thing right now is the light rail expanding North, West, and Northwest. Several new lines going in could of course increase the value of real estate, but that is speculation and if the market turns or the lines get delayed you could suffer.

In my opinion, if you are trying to grow your money quickly and are less concerned with the income, you should purchase as many properties as you can, especially those of you in Minnesota. Inventory is not as tight as other parts of the county and it is still easy to buy rentals with no down payment. To purchase as many properties as you can you need to leverage as much as you can.

I want to close by sharing one last opinion. Although I am a strong believer in leverage and being smart about it, I understand that it is not always the best way to go. In Colorado specifically, there are not many deals. Travis, Justin and I talk about this frequently. We all want more deals in Denver but cannot find them. If there are limited deals in the areas you want to buy, you need other investment vehicles to put your money. For some that is investing outside your area, which is what I am doing and for some it is paying off your loans, which I am also doing. If you want to buy more but cannot find the deals, by all means focus on paying off the loans. That is much better than leaving your money in the bank doing nothing.

If you have any stories on the relating topic please feel free to share.

Amazon HQ2 rumors rattle New York and DC real estate markets

Washington, DC( CNN Business) It hasn't been announced hitherto. It wouldn't happen for months, if not times after it was announced. But Amazon's possible appearance in Northern Virginia and Queens, New York, has already routed shockwaves through smothering real estate marketplaces.

All of a sudden, the two-bedroom condo in a 1980 s-era construct that had been sitting on the market for nearly three months with no offerings, even after world prices trimmed, had a flood of interest. Gemond did eight testifies in one day, for people who wouldn't keep telling her why they were interested — but who she supposes were either investors looking to flip-flop the property or hire it out at an increase charge, or parties from firms planning to locate near Amazon if it moves in.

“It feels like that instant in a horse race where all the ponies are lined up in the starting gate, ” says Gemond. “They're precisely antsy and ready to should be going, they're waiting for that gate to be lifted.”

Rookie Mistakes To Avoid When Investing In An Apartment Building

An apartment building can still be a good financing today. Why? For starters, there are still a lot of people who are still looking for homes to hire. In addition, the units of an apartment building do not just “ve got to be” gaps for palace or dwellings for categories and individuals. By getting the freedom tolerates, groups in an apartment house is to be able to rented out as commercial spaces.

First-time purchasers of apartment house will certainly have high expectations regarding this particular asset. This is mainly because they will invest a significant amount of money for this endeavour. As such, if you want to make sure you will own the right apartment building that can help you find success in the areas of quality rentals, make sure you avoid these common( and costly) rookie mistakes 😛 TAGEND

Not looking into the history and reputation of the apartment building's developer or developer .

As a first-time owner of an apartment house, the last stuff you want to happen is to stumble upon some structural difficulties or arrangement downfalls. As such, it was essential to to check the background, capability, and reputation of the company that fabricated the whole property. Becoming online and requesting companies or individuals that have worked with the real estate developers is a good way to get some themes about their competency. If the property developer has a good stature and has stellar remembers about the owneds they improve, occasions are, it is quite safe to buy a building that they constructed.

Buying a quality that is located in an unpopular country .

When purchasing an apartment building, keep in memory that aside from national budgets, an important factor you have to consider is its place. Real manor professionals say that it is a good idea to buy a asset in an area that is improving since buying in a refusing orientation will simply result in high-pitched vacancies and tariff drops.

Not having sufficient cash flow and earmarks .

As a newbie investor, if “youre not” confident with your reserved funds, you are required to get into deals that will create a immediate cash flow only. Avoid going into deals that won't offer a cash flow from day one even though it is that event predicts a huge potential profit since you may be settled at risk of being unable to pay the bills.

In addition, make sure you have enough money reserves. Downfall to do so can get you involved in different involved situations. As a “owners “, keep in mind that a lot of unexpected matters can happen. As such, you need to have a reserve account that is adequate to pay for these emergencies.